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Realize Your Higher Personal Possibilities

Part 1

When we go though life giving of ourselves the bare minimum to get by, it should come as no surprise to us that life returns to us the same! Excellence is the child of effort, whose parents are known as Patience and Love.

Part 2

The difference between quitting a task, as opposed to reaching the end of our possibilities with it . . . is this: Whenever we quit our wish to succeed at something, we have first embraced a false sense of hopelessness born of an equally false conclusion about ourselves: namely, that our past failings have formed an inescapable pattern. But, when we will work through a chosen task until we come to the end of our abilities and then remain there -- aware of our temporary limitations, as well as of those fearful parts of us that would punish us for them -- in such moments we stand at the threshold of our True Potential. For in our willingness to journey to what seems the end of us, we are gifted with the understanding that there is no ending to our True Self; and so, each time we dare to tread these unknown lands of ourselves, dawns within us a new and Higher set of Personal Possibilities, along with the will to explore them.

Tap Into the Power of True Self

There is a rather famous old World War II song entitled "Off We Go Into the Wild Blue Yonder." One of the reasons this song became memorable is that its lyrics touched on something deep in the human heart.

The only lyric I can remember from this song is sufficient to make my point: "Off we go/into the wild blue yonder/flying high into the sky." Coupled with its emotionally rising melody, the idea seeded into these words speaks to our inherent longing to be free of limitations, to reach into uncluttered, open spaces within ourselves wherein all is free and filled with promise.

Everyone senses we are intended to be free creatures, to be able to roam and enjoy ever-widening spaces without the fear of falling. And even if we are not conscious of this sentiment, or perhaps even scoff at its idea, nevertheless we still experience our pleasures and pains as an effect of this unfettered consciousness within us.

Think about this for a moment. How else do we explain why we so often feel as though we are not free? Or that we are somehow unwilling captives of our own life? How can we know what something is not, or sense what we are not, unless there stands within us, at the same time, that which is this very state of self we feel is missing?

Freedom, real freedom, does exist. But it is not a condition of events, nor is it found within another person's approval of us. Neither is real freedom ever a mere effect of circumstances, otherwise it is not freedom but merely a temporary pleasure we have mistaken for being the same as being free.

What, then, is real freedom? Where is it to be found? Let us start by saying that freedom is a quality of Truth, one of its great branches. And as it has been so timelessly spoken of, it is in realizing the truth of ourselves that we are set free. This is why there is no substitute for the true self-knowledge that follows.

Our present self often feels itself captive because the only way it can "know" itself is through the unconscious comparison of its past experiences to its present circumstances. In other words, this level of self only knows what it is once it has gazed into the mirror of what it was. This realm of reflections represents its entire range of existence.

Anytime life brings along an event that can't be neatly fit into the pre-set realm of this self, it immediately gets shaky. Suddenly finding itself unable to be certain as to the meaning of the unwanted moment, this lower level of self fears the loss of its imagined control. The way it deals with this fear -- in order to regain its lost "powers" -- is to mentally reconfigure its reality until once again comfortable in its self-constructed kooky kingdom. But here is the point of describing all of this to you.

Without our awareness of this interior kingdom and its covert operations that keep us captive, we are little more than prisoners confined to the limitations of this level of consciousness. But this construed consciousness is not our True Consciousness. Stated another way, this limited realm at the root of our present reality is not the whole Kingdom available to us. It is in our seeing the truth of this, and what it intimates to us about the potential of our True Self, that the path to freedom is revealed. For now we know: We must leave this self behind. And this action requires learning to take conscious, spiritual risks. What is a spiritual risk?

A spiritual risk is any action we will take based upon our willingness to challenge our own certainty that our present state of consciousness represents the full measure of life's possibility. Here is one simple example for our study: Maybe we feel as though no one understands our situation or that no one is being sensitive to the pressure we're under. During these times most of us feel the strong need to complain to someone -- anyone (including ourselves) -- in order to win some sympathy. The conscious risk in this case is to give no voice to any complaints, either outwardly or inwardly.

Whenever we feel ourselves certain that we are a captive of something -- be it anything from a fear of proceeding with a wish we have, to that feeling of being inadequate to getting through a task at hand -- we remember in this same self-defining moment that this reality before our eyes is, at best, only a partial one. And then, as unthinkable as it seems to us in this same moment, as certain as we may feel that real freedom is beyond our reach, we make the conscious leap into the Wild New Yonder. What does this mean? What is the Wild New Yonder?

Once we realize that our present view of self, a view that defines our reality, is a construct of a certain level of our own consciousness -- one that's convinced the limit of its present view is the limit of its possibility -- we also realize the need to leave this self-limited world behind us.

Knowing the makeup of this world we must abandon, we have but one choice: Let go of who we are sure we are and make a leap into the Wild New Yonder. Our new and conscious choice is to discover what awaits us in the open-ended reality, instead of allowing ourselves to be grounded by a preconceived notion of who we are and what we can do.

Nothing can stop us from taking this leap into all that we may be, other than this mistaken and unconscious conviction we have of who we already are -- a mindset supported by the strange comfort we find in clinging to who we have been.

Find the places in your life where you can take these conscious, spiritual risks. The liberation you win will be the repeated discovery that the only thing holding you captive is yourself. Make nothing more valuable than your inner work to enter into the Wild New Yonder.

This article is excerpted from Seeker's Guide to Self-Freedom (pages 186-190.).

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